On the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, Vale reinforces the rejection of any type of work condition that is similar to slavery

About Vale

12/3/2020

On the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, Vale reinforces the rejection of any type of work condition that is similar to slavery

In Brazil, slavery was abolished in 1888 with Lei Áurea [the Golden Law]. However, as in other countries, slavery still exists in Brazil, in the context of modernity.

International standards have led to developments in the concept of modern slavery, which still needs to be strongly fought. Modern slavery occurs when workers are subjected to life and work conditions with restrictions on freedom and the absence of compensation or insufficient compensation. On the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, held on December 02, Vale reinforces the rejection of any type of work condition that is similar to slavery.

There are global Treaties, Conventions and Pacts that have been dealing with the subject since 1926. At Vale, the fight against slavery is expressed in the Human Rights Policy and in more detail in the Human Rights Guide, which addresses the company's stance and the conduct expected from all its employees, in-house and third party, and suppliers. The same guidance is reflected in the Supplier´s code of conduct. Vale also has anonymous reporting channels, such as the ombudsman´s office, which allow employees, suppliers or partners to register complaints if they suffer or witness any situation related to this issue.

Legislation

Although the concept of modern slavery is well defined by international law, some countries also regulate it through domestic laws. In the United Kingdom, for example, the Modern Slavery Act (2015) was created in 2015. Australia also created its own Modern Slavery Act in 2018. In Canada, new legislation is in the process of being passed, requiring, among other things, that companies annually report and publish the measures they take in their supply chain to identify and prevent the occurrence of slave labour.

In Brazil, putting people in conditions that are similar to slavery is a crime and can result in imprisonment. In the eyes of Government agencies, the occurrence of slave labour results in inclusion of the offender's name on a “dirty list”, which can cause a considerable amount of damage to business activity.

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On the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, Vale reinforces the rejection of any type of work condition that is similar to slavery