UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – Learn About Vale’s Relationship with these Peoples in Brazil and Other Countries

About Vale

9/13/2020

UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – Learn About Vale’s Relationship with these Peoples in Brazil and Other Countries

 Photo of two Indians holding a tree stump with the text September 13: UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Day  Photo of two Indians holding a tree stump with the text September 13: UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Day  

“The Declaration (...) is a tool for peace and justice, based upon mutual recognition and mutual respect.” Exactly 13 years have passed since Les Malezer, Chair of the Global Indigenous Peoples’ Caucus, spoke these words and issued the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which also serves as a guide for Vale’s interactions with these peoples.

The document is the result of the resistance of these peoples in claiming their rights and creates awareness on the historical oppression against indigenous peoples, in addition to promoting tolerance, understanding and good relations with other segments of society. Vale values this interaction and has a team of more than 20 professionals specialized and experienced in the subject, with support from indigenous and anthropological advisory firms exclusively dedicated to maintaining ongoing dialogue with 13 indigenous peoples in Brazil. The initiative is also developed in other countries where Vale operates including Canada, Peru and New Caledonia.

Vale builds its relationship with Indigenous Peoples and Traditional Communities according to the guidelines established in its Global Human Rights Policy, which is based on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and other references like the ILO (International Labor Organization) Convention No. 169 on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples. In addition, Vale trains employees, suppliers and partners that interact with these peoples to act according with the company’s guidelines.

 Photo of two indigenous children  Photo of two indigenous children  

Why Protect the Rights of Indigenous Peoples?

Before the Declaration, Indigenous rights in many parts of the world were treated as needs or even favors and privileges granted by States. In Brazil, the rights of indigenous peoples were consolidated with the 1988 Constitution. However, enforcement and implementation of such rights still involves numerous challenges.

“Indigenous peoples have a special relationship with their lands. Natural resources are essential for their survival, way of living, cosmology and belief system. Indigenous peoples are guardians of these lands and sources of traditional knowledge and a wide range of linguistic and cultural diversity for humanity. Everyone must strive to protect the rights and memories of these peoples,” explained Carol Nascimento, Indigenous Peoples and Traditional Communities Relations analyst at Vale.

About the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Declaration is a comprehensive international instrument on the rights of indigenous peoples. It establishes a universal framework of minimum, individual and collective standards for protection, freedom and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.

The document also establishes the right to self-determination and free, prior and informed consent (the right of indigenous peoples to be properly consulted before any measure that may affect their way of living is adopted), the right to reparation for the theft of their properties, the right to maintain their cultures and the right to communication, among others.


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UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – Learn About Vale’s Relationship with these Peoples in Brazil and Other Countries