Logistics

Ports and Terminals

Our clients and operations are spread across the five continents. To integrate them, we make use of a network of modern, efficient ports and terminals, many of which are linked to our mines by railroads.

We have deep-draft ports, fully equipped to receive Valemax ships – the biggest mineral vessels in the world, each with capacity for 400,000 tonnes of ore. To operate in shallower ports, we have installed Floating Transfer Stations, where ore is moved from Valemax ships to smaller vessels.

This integrated logistics chain enables us to take fewer trips, primarily between Brazil and Asia, not only cutting costs and operating time but also reducing gas emissions.

We run port operations in Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia and Oman, also providing a cargo service to third parties. Find out more:

  • Port of Tubarão

    Brasil Brazil

  • Ponta da Madeira Terminal

    Brasil Brazil

  • Itaguaí Terminal

    Brasil Brazil

  • Guaíba Island Terminal

    Brasil Brazil

  • Port of Sohar

    Brasil Omã

  • Teluk Rubiah Terminal

    Brasil Malaysia

  • Balantang Special Port

    Brasil Indonesia

  • Tanjung Mangkasa

    Brasil Indonesia

  • San Nicolas

    Brasil Argentina

  • Port of Tubarão

    Located near the Port of Vitória in the Brazilian state of Espírito Santo, this port covers 18 square kilometres and consists of four maritime terminals: Iron Ore, Praia Mole, Diverse Products and Bulk Liquids. The port handles iron ore and pellets, coal, grains, fertilizers and bulk liquids.

    Regulation:

  • Ponta da Madeira Terminal

    Located near the Port of Itaqui in the Brazilian state of Maranhão, this terminal is capable of accommodating five ships at the same time. It is mainly used to export iron ore, although it also handles manganese ore, copper concentrate and pig iron produced by Vale.

    Regulation:

  • Itaguaí Terminal

    Located at the Port of Sepetiba in the state of Rio de Janeiro, this terminal is operated by a wholly owned Vale subsidiary, Cia. Portuária Baía de Sepetiba (CPBS). It is used to export iron ore.

  • Guaíba Island Terminal

    Located on Guaíba Island in Sepetiba Bay in the state of Rio de Janeiro, this terminal is used to export iron ore.

    Regulation:

  • Inácio Barbosa Terminal

    Located in the Brazilian state of Sergipe, this terminal belongs to Petrobras but is operated by Vale. It is used to handle fuels, agricultural products and steel.

  • Santos Terminal

    Located in Santos, in the state of São Paulo, this terminal is operated by Vale Fertilizantes, a Vale subsidiary. It is used to handle ammonia and bulk solids.

  • Port of Sohar

    Located in Oman, in the Persian Gulf, the Port of Sohar has an iron ore terminal built for Vale’s operations, and is capable of accommodating Very Large Ore Carriers (VLOCs). From there, iron ore can be distributed in smaller ships to nearby locations.

  • Teluk Rubiah Terminal

    Located in Malaysia, in the state of Perak, the maritime terminal began operating in November 2014. It is composed of a deep-water port and five stockyards, where different types of iron ore may be blended and customized in line with steel companies’ needs. Equipped with an import berth capable of unloading ships of up to 400,000 metric tonnage and an export berth able to load Capesize ships, the maritime terminal acts as a distribution centre for Asia, maintaining a constant stock of Brazilian iron ore.

    Find out more about this important logistical facility of Vale’s in this infographic.

  • Balantang Special Port

    Located in Balantang Village in South Sulawesi, Indonesia, this port belongs to PT Vale Indonesia (PTVI), which operates a facility for loading barges with dry bulk goods and a general cargo wharf.

  • Harapan Tanjung Mangkasa

    Located in Haparan Tanjung Mangkasa Village in South Sulawesi, Indonesia, this port has mooring buoys to accommodate ships and a terminal that can receive tankers.

  • San Nicolas

    Vale Logística Argentina operates a terminal at the Port of San Nicolas in the province of Buenos Aires, used to store and handle iron ore and manganese.