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Our People

Our management: commitment to people

With a headcount of approximately 185,000 people (including company employees and permanent third-parties), Vale is committed to caring for people, acting to eliminate accidents, support the development of competencies, promoting an environment open to dialogue and maintaining compensation compatible with the complexity of each function.

Performance

Headcount

Company employees

70,270 2018

71,149 2019

74,316 2020

72,266 2021

Third-parties

54,644 2018

78,143 2019

111,921 2020

141,147 2021

By gender (2020)

19% Female

81% Male

Persons with disabilities (2021)

4% Number of Brazilian professionals with special needs

Total number of own employees

Per business area 2018 2019 2020 2021
Ferrous minerals 43,504 42,077 44,342 44,235
Base metals 14,349 13,738 13,762 12,903
Coal 2,350 2,927 3,320 5,492
Other 10,067 12,407 12,892 9,636
Total 70,270 71,149 74,316 72,266
Per business area

Ferrous minerals

2018
43,504

2019
42,077

2020
44,342

2021
44,235

Base metals

2018
14,349

2019
13,738

2020
13,762

2021
12,903

Coal

2018
2,350

2019
2,970

2020
3,320

2021
5,492

Other

2018
10,067

2019
12,407

2020
12,892

2021
9,636

Total

2018
70.270

2019
71.149

2020
74,316

2021
73.596

Per geographical location 2018 2019 2020 2021
Brazil 55,230 55,439 58,249 55,067
Canada 6,029 6,078 6,166 6,443
Indonesia 3,128 3,095 3,082 3,040
New Caledonia * 1,359 1,373 1,255 0
Australia 19 11 8 10
United States 3 4 3 5
China 152 179 164 153
Mozambique 2,664 3,279 3,698 5,399
Peru 29 33 31 31
Chile 10 12 12 12
Other 1,647 1,646 1,648 2,106
Total 70,270
71,149
74,316
72,266
Per geographical location

Brazil

2018
55,230

2019
55,439

2020
58,249

2021
55,067

Canada

2018
6,029

2019
6,078

2020
6,166

2021
6,443

Indonesia

2018
3,128

2019
3,095

2020
3,082

2021
3,040

New Caledonia *

2018
1,359

2019
1,373

2020
1,255

2021
0

Australia

2018
19

2019
11

2020
8

2021
10

United States

2018
3

2019
4

2020
3

2021
5

China

2018
152

2019
179

2020
164

2021
153

Mozambique

2018
2,664

2019
3,279

2020
3,698

2021
5,399

Peru

2018
29

2019
33

2020
31

2021
31

Chile

2018
10

2019
12

2020
12

2021
12

Other

2018
1,647

2019
1,646

2020
1,648

2021
2,106

Total

2021
73,596

2018
70,270

2019
71,149

2020
74,316

Number of contractors

Per business area 2018 2019 2020 2021
Ferrous 26,714 27,749 34,042 46,327
Base metals 9,793 10,828
10,395 15,207
Coal 4,212 5,900 6,076 7,416
Other 14,868 33,666 61,408 72,197
Total 54,644 78,143 111,921 141,147
Per business area

Ferrous minerals

2018
26,714

2019
27,749

2020
34,042

2021
46,327

Base metals

2018
8,850

2019
10,828

2020
10,395

2021
15,207

Coal

2018
4.212

2019
5.900

2020
6,076

2021
7,416

Other

2018
14.868

2019
33.666

2020
61,408

2021
72,197

Total

2018
54.644

2019
78.143

2020
111,921

2021
141,147

Per geographical location 2018 2019 2020 2021
Brazil
40,371 57,388 90,877 114,757
Canada 2,918 3,892 4,617 4,311
Indonesia 3,242 5,657 6,499 7,515
New Caledonia * 1,203 1,081 192 0
Australia - 1 6 6
China 18 18 20 18
Mozambique 5,543 8,731 8,016 11,085
Peru 2 2 2 3
Chile 11 28 89 110
Other 1,336 1,345 1,603 3,342
Total 54,644 78,143 111,921 141,147
Per geographical location

Brazil

2018
40,371

2019
57,388

2020
90,877

2021
114,757

Canada

2018
2,918

2019
3,892

2020
4,617

2021
4,311

Indonesia

2018
3,242

2019
5,657

2020
6,499

2021
7,515

New Caledonia *

2018
1,203

2018
1,081

2020
192

2021
0

Australia

2018
-

2019
1

2020
6

2021
6

China

2018
18

2019
18

2020
20

2021
18

Mozambique

2018
5,543

2019
8,731

2020
8,016

2021
11,085

Peru

2018
2

2019
2

2020
2

2021
3

Chile

2018
11

2019
28

2020
89

2021
110

Other

2018
1,336

2019
1,345

2020
1,603

2021
3,342

Total

2021
56,979

2018
54,644

2019
78,143

2020
141,147

*In 2021, Vale completed the sale of Vale New Caledonia to Prony Resources.

Year to year details about employee numbers (company and third-parties)

  • 2018 – The number of third-parties in the Iron Ore area grew by 39% due to the following factors:
    • increase in the production of iron ore and pellets with the ramp-up at Serra Sul, the return of Mills 1, 2 and São Luís, among others;
    • start up of the new Contract Management System
    • new rule for counting third-parties by their tax number (CPF) and no longer by work post.
  • 2019 – The number of third-parties grew by 43% – 31% among those contracted for projects and 12% of third-parties among the permanent workers – due to:
    • execution of dam containment projects;
    • increase in the current project portfolio;
    • increase in works for major projects approved in the second half of 2018 (Salobo III, Programa 240 and Programa do Gelado);
    • increase in volume of works for two major projects in Canada (VBME and CCM Phase 1).
  • 2020 – In 2020, the number of third-parties increased by 43% as a result of:
    • Reparation works;
    • increase in the current project portfolio;
    • the resumption of works in 2020, after the shutdown caused by the Covid-19 pandemic; and
    • the inclusion of third-parties associated with hiring by service level – “outsourcing” (not reported in previous years).
  • 2021- In 2021, the number of third-parties increased by 26% as a result of:
    • Reparation works;
    • Increase in the portfolio of projects such as Capanema, FICO, and the resumption of works after Covid-19 restrictions were lifted, including the filtration plants, in Salobo III and S11D+10 Mtpy.

Diversity and Inclusion

In 2019, Vale established a commitment to value diversity and promote inclusion by approving a global diversity strategy. This has four drivers: the promotion of a safe environment and respect for each person’s singularities; ensuring transparent and fair processes free of prejudice in hiring, assessing, promoting and involving a diversified labor force; not tolerating any type of harassment or prejudice; and stimulating debate and expanding awareness about diversity.

In this respect, Vale adopted the target of doubling the number of women working in the company by 2030, from 13% to 26%, and of increasing female leadership, from 12% to 20%. This commitment is aligned with our Global Diversity and Inclusion Policy, Global Human Rights Policy and our Code of Conduct.

We recognize we are at the beginning of a long journey. Our focus is on creating conditions and opportunities that will enable all talents to realize their full potential and contribute towards the achievement of company strategy, driving results for all stakeholders. The condition for this is the establishment of a relationship of respect and inclusion, anchored in open and transparent dialogue, elements which are also indispensable for the construction of psychologically health environments and the sustainable development of our businesses.

It is important for us to understand our culture, the nature of our people and our stage of learning in order to make robust progress. This has happened with the gender and LGBTIA+ agendas and, more recently, in the ethnic-racial and local talent areas.

Two Vale employees in uniform: a middle-aged white man and a young black woman. On the upper right side, there is the text “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion 2020/2021”.

The Diversity, Equity and Inclusion report aims to increase transparency about how we are performing, objectively presenting our advances, challenges and opportunities in this long journey.

Access the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Report

For further information:


Some initiatives

We recognize that there are gaps and that we have a long way to go in promoting equality and effectively practicing inclusion.

We have implemented diverse structural measures that have contributed to the evolution of the company’s situation.

Below there is an overview of the initiatives – other points will be addressed in the course of this channel:

Double the number of female professionals by 2030 (from 13% to 26%);
In 2020, we trained more than 2,000 leaders in Unconscious Biases, Female Leadership, Toxic Masculinity, Gender Intelligence, among others.
To stimulate debate and share information and ideas among our employees, we supported the formation of affinity groups. In 2020, we formed ethnic racial equality and LGBTQ+ groups in Brazil. The women’s group was formed in 2019.
We provided technical training programs for more than 500 newly hired women to work in operational functions on our sites in Brazil and Canada;
Thinking about leaders for the future, for the first time ever in 2020 the Trainee Program had the declared intention of contracting 50% men and 50% women. However, it should be noted that since the 2018, the trainee recruitment process has been “blind”, that is the candidate’s gender is not revealed before their technical qualities for the vacancy have been assessed.
We promote diverse workshops, internal campaigns, webinars and rounds of conversation to listen to employees and to create learning opportunities about important subjects such as gender, racism, sexual orientation and disabilities, with a total of more than 15,000 participations. We have also launched campaigns on the social networks (LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram) to attract diverse talents.
We created a project to provide visibility for women in the mining industry and to promote gender equality in this sector. Female employees from Oman, Canada, Indonesia, Switzerland and Brazil participated in this project, which was idealized and directed by women.


Gender equality

In 2019, Vale established the target of doubling the number of women in its work force from 13% to 26% by 2030.

In 2020, we reached the mark of 16.3% women in the work force on a global basis. We ended the year with 11,443 female employees, which corresponded to a 26% increase over 2019, when we had 9,050 women in the company.

We have reached 15.9% of women in senior management positions. In 2019, women represented 12.4% of senior managers in the company (executive managers, directors, executive directors).


Why 26%?

This definition took Vale’s current context into account, in addition to the overall situation of the mining sector which historically has a predominance of men.
In the locations in which Vale operates, specific training programs are being implemented aimed at preparing women to occupy positions in operational areas and to expand their participation on our sites both in Brazil and in Canada.
We implemented the company’s Trainee Program with a blind selection process. We hired 61% women, with the objective of increasing our pipeline of future leaders.
We created a Professional Training Program in the operation in Brazil and Canada exclusively for women, hiring approximately 500 women.
We reduced the voluntary termination rate for women by 33.5%.
In February 2020, Vale also conducted a workshop on Diversity and Inclusion, with the participation of all the company’s senior management.

Workforce composition per age group (2020):

69 (0.09%) up to 20 years old

11.223 (15.10%) from 21 to 30 years old

33.094 (44.53%) from 31 to 40 years old

21.473 (28.89%) from 41 to 50 years old

7.472 (10.05%) from 51 to 60 years old

985 (1.33%) more than 60 years old

Number of employees per gender and seniority level (%)

Composition per gender (2020)

16% Female

84% Male

Commitment: We are signatories of the UN Women's Empowerment Principles

Seniority level (2020) Female (%) Male (%)
Director 4% 96%
Executive Manager 19% 81%
Manager & Specialist 20% 80%
Supervisor 13% 87%
Staff 16% 84%
Seniority level (2020)

Female (%)

Director
4%

Executive Manager
19%

Manager & Specialist
20%

Supervisor
13%

Staff
16%

Male (%)

Director
96%

Executive Manager
81%

Manager & Specialist
80%

Supervisor
87%

Staff
84%

Median Salary per gender and seniority level (corporate and operational) -2019

Corresponds to the value (%) above or below the median salary of our professionals, per gender, seniority level, and per area (Corporate or operational)

Corporate

Operational

Maternity and paternity leave per region

In line with the best practices in the market, our company has adhered to the Brazilian Government program ‘Empresa Cidadã’, wich extends the maternity leave by 60 days (from 120 to 180 days), and the paternity leave by 15 days (from 5 to 20 days).

Number of days Maternity Leave Paternity Leave
Brazil 180 20
Oman 60 3
Mozambique - Vale 100 3
Mozambique - Nacala Logisttics Corridor 90 5
Uruguay 98 -
Singapore 112 10 working days
Switzerland 112 5 working days
Malasya 120 2 working days
Malawi - CEAR 100 N/A
Dubai 65 working days 3 working days
China 128 10
Japan 56 2 working days
Australia 120 14
Number od days

Brazil

Maternity Leave
180

Paternity Leave
20

Oman

Maternity Leave
60

Paternity Leave
3

Mozambique - Vale

Maternity Leave
100

Paternity Leave
3

Mozambique - Corredor Logístico Nacala

Maternity Leave
90

Paternity Leave
5

Uruguay

Maternity Leave
98

Paternity Leave
-

Singapore

Maternity Leave
112

Paternity Leave
10 working days

Switzerland

Maternity Leave
112

Paternity Leave
5 working days

Malasya

Maternity Leave
120

Paternity Leave
2 working days

Malawi - CEAR

Maternity Leave
100

Paternity Leave
N/A

Dubai

Maternity Leave
65 working days

Paternity Leave
3 working days

China

Maternity Leave
128

Paternity Leave
10

Japan

Maternity Leave
56

Paternity Leave
2 working days

Australia

Maternity Leave
120

Paternity Leave
14

Cultural Transformation

To transform Vale into one of the safest and most reliable companies in the mining sector worldwide and to promote full reparation in Brumadinho, Vale remains committed to transforming its culture. This process seeks to promote culture as a facilitator of strategy, influencing and modeling systems, integrating initiatives, as well as positioning the company’s leaders as drivers of change.

The main behaviors for the organization were defined based on the company’s essential values:


  • obsession with safety and risk management;
  • open and transparent dialogue;
  • empowerment with accountability;
  • responsibility for the whole;
  • active listening and engagement with society.

A cultural diagnosis was undertaken in 2020 and indicated the need to build a culture of joint learning, with humility, discipline, a sense of the collective and, most importantly, a feeling of chronic discomfort in relation to safety. At this moment, the behaviors are being scaled up, with the measurement of advances.

Vale’s ambitions for the next five years have been defined within this context:


  • to be a large company recognized by society as a benchmark in safety;
  • the best and most reliable operator; 
  • oriented to talent;
  • leader in low carbon mining; and
  • a benchmark in creating and sharing value.

Five levers are worthy of note in this construction: Safety, the Vale Production System (VPS), People, Innovation and ESG.

An integrated plan is driving the initiatives related to comprehension of the company’s organizational culture and behaviors, including leadership development and the review of organizational processes and systems. The cultural elements have also been integrated into the Vale management model - VPS. Indicators will measure the advances in strategic aspects and will permit the monitoring of the process over the coming years.

Leaders’ Forum

Held in 2019 as a space oriented to the development of Vale leadership, the Leaders’ Forum marked the company’s commitment to propagating the practice of the expected behaviors and to engaging everyone in the cultural evolution journey. In 2020, two meetings marked the continuity of the cultural transformation by means of collective learning.

The following actions stemmed from these meetings:

  • 5 culture workshops with the Board of Executive Directors and focus on the cultural evolution in 2019 and monthly meetings complemented by individual coaching in 2020;
  • 1 workshop with the leadership teams in Iron Minerals and Global Business Support;
  • 6 meetings with the leverage (systems) leaders, with the objective of mapping the functional initiatives from a cultural perspective in 2019 and; coaching with the leverage leaders and sponsors of the Board of Executive Directors to work on the organizational systems in 2020;
  • 2 cultural diagnoses that provided a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organizational culture and involved the participation of more than 500 employees (at all levels);
  • 3 workshops with the Board of Directors and interviews with all the members;
  • 4 workshops to train approximately 60 executives with a focus on culture;
  • 2 workshops on leadership at times of crisis and the conscious impact on culture with senior management at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • Global launch of the Impact program for management level, with a focus on key behaviors – by the end of 2020, around 1,300 managers had participated in this development journey. In 2020, the version of the program for supervisors was also launched, with around 200 participations.
  • Engagement of 200 executives in the theme cultural evolution in 2019 and expansion of the awareness of the role of leaders as role models for behavior in the cultural transformation through the curatorship of relevant contents in 2020;
  • 360º assessments focused on living the behaviors conducted with approximately 60 executives.
  • Implementation of pilots of the business transformation plan integrating culture and the management model (VPS) in 4 operational sites in Brazil with the participation of around 100 leaders;
  • Formation of a global network of change influencers, with 40 catalyzers selected to influence and disseminate the key behaviors; and more than 50 HR leaders prepared to exercise the role of influencer and coach;
  • Onboarding of suppliers and key stakeholders, focused on consistency, alignment of concepts, methodology, language and connections with Culture;
  • Development of the Vale Purpose through engagement, listening and co-construction involving more than 50 executives and the participation of the Board of Directors and the Board of Executive Officers;

Performance

The Vale Career and Succession process is aimed at creating a culture based on merit, development and mentoring, with transparency and ongoing dialogue, generating value for Vale’s people and for its businesses. The process is aimed at (a) assessing the deliveries executed and how they are underpinned by the main expected behaviors, (b) assessing people’s competencies and (c) identifying employees’ potential and orientating their development and their capacity to lead their own career paths.

At the same time, development and qualification guide Vale’s educational strategy by means of a portfolio of training courses and assessments that reinforce the competencies that the employees need to work in the company. The internal and external recruitment model has been intentionally reformulated to drive greater adherence to the cultural goals and the focus on diversity.

The performance review process for Vale employees is based on the key behaviors defined for all the company’s leaders and is intended to reinforce the pursuit of better performance, recognition of merit, as well as stimulating the cultural transformation desired by Vale.

Regarding the process itself, in addition to performing a self-assessment and being assessed by their immediate manager, employees may request feedback from other employees, via system, to better understand their opportunities for development. The assessments are also discussed by a committee comprising the immediate superior and his/her peers. The objective is to ensure weighting of the performance of the employees compared with the other appraisees in pursuit of greater balance in terms of merit.

The reviews impact the annual bonus of the executives, their eligibility for the long-term incentive program, as well as merit increases in their fixed remuneration. It is worthy of note that development measures are also based on the employees’ performance and there are incentives for ongoing feedback throughout the year and not just during the annual performance review.

The combination of the conducive environment and the management model is a powerful tool for driving cultural change. For this reason, the implementation of the revised management model has been integrated into the movement of cultural awareness for leaders with a view to accelerating the connection between the aspirations and the impact on the daily routines of the operations.


Training

By means of its Corporate University –Valer, Vale has developed a portfolio of training courses and development measures for its diverse audiences. The focuses include technical, management and leadership skills, as well as cross-cutting topics that are key to company strategy, such as safety, the VPS management model, risk management and sustainability.

In response to the challenges posed by the pandemic, with the migration of a large part of our work force to remote working, we managed to expand our digital learning platform, Valer Digital, to more than 30,000 employees globally.

An example of the speed of adaption to the new situation was the organization of the Annual Meeting of Specialists and Operational Improvement. The format was 100% virtual, with more than 8,000 employee accesses over a two-day period, with programming that included presentations of projects, talks, an exhibition fair and a great deal of networking, constituting an incredibly immersive experience for our employees worldwide.

In 2020, we maintained our focus on technical specialization for engineers and geologists, by means of postgraduate and master’s programs adapted to a virtual format. We maintained our commitment to the development of the 131 young talents in our 2020 Global Trainee Program, guaranteeing the ongoing active management of our leadership pipeline. The whole program had been designed before the pandemic and was revised and adapted to the virtual format.

What would be considered an unfavorable context for learning ended up opening new paths that reinforced mobility, networked learning, diversification of formats and the proactive stance of our employees in pursuit of self-development.


Succession

Succession planning measures the organization’s capacity to provide opportunities for people demonstrating superior performance over time, to develop behaviors aligned with the desired culture, to constantly stimulate high performance, to foster the expansion of skills and to unlock individual potential, ensuring the future success of the business.

In this respect, in November 2019 we established the Global Talent Review to identify and develop successors, not only for positions on the Board of Executive Officers, but also for critical leadership positions, with a focus on generating future value for the business.

In 2020, we established that, on average, 30% of the company’s critical positions should have options of successors in the short, medium and long-terms. The purpose was also to foster the oxygenation of talents between the businesses and promote gender diversity. We exceeded this target, reaching an average of 50% of positions meeting these criteria.


Attracting Talents

As part of Vale’s cultural transformation, we want to attract and retain the best professionals, aligned with our purpose and our culture and to be recognized as a talent-oriented organization. In 2020, the concept of strategic recruitment, aligned with the Vale Production System, was implanted throughout Brazil. This focuses on the candidate’s experience and uses artificial intelligence to ensure a more effective search for suitable profiles. Furthermore, diversity is a key pillar in the company’s talent attraction and selection strategy. In 2021, we are seeking to stabilize these practices in Brazil and initiate global expansion, starting with Canada.

We included the elaboration of an Employer Brand Value Proposition to reinforce the qualities of the organizational culture and more attractive work experiences for employees and candidates. The EVP provides the main attributes and topics that sustain all the employer brand activities and communications. It is the basis for the underlying content to be transformed into messages and a communication strategy to bring the culture to life and to connect different groups of candidates.

Turnover of professionals - 2020

Turnover (%) Voluntary (%) Involuntary (%) Total (%)
Global 0.90%
6.13%​
7.48%
Vale S.A. 0.61%
6.36%​
7.06%​
Turnover (%)

Global

Turnover (%)
0.90%

Involuntary (%)
6.13%

Total (%)
7.48%

Vale S.A.

Turnover (%)
0.61%

Involuntary (%)
6.36%​

Total (%)
7.06%​

Turnover of professionals (per gender) - 2020

Gender Voluntary (%) Involuntary (%) Total (%)
Men 0.85%
6.54%​
7.89%
Women 1.17%
3.70%
5.02%
Gender

Men

Turnover (%)
0.85%

Involuntary (%)
6.54%​

Total (%)
7.89%

Women

Turnover (%)
1.17%

Involuntary (%)
3.70%

Total (%)
5.02%

Turnover of professionals (per seniority level) - 2020

Seniority level Voluntary (%) Involuntary (%) Total (%)
Officer 5.50%
11.01%
16.51%​
Executive Manager 0.00%
10.25%
10.25%
Manager & Tech. Specialist 2.03%
7.67%
9.88%
Coordinator 1.93%
3.85%
5.78%
Supervisor 1.09%
7.61%
9.87%
Staff 0.85%
6.01%
7.30%
Seniority level

Officer

Turnover (%)
5.50%

Involuntary (%)
11.01%

Total (%)
16.51%

Executive Manager

Turnover (%)
0.00%

Involuntary (%)
10.25%

Total (%)
10.25%​

Manager & Tech. Specialist

Turnover (%)
2.03%

Involuntary (%)
7.67%

Total (%)
9.88%​

Coordinator

Turnover (%)
1.93%

Involuntary (%)
3.85%

Total (%)
5.78%

Supervisor

Turnover (%)
1.09%

Involuntary (%)
7.61%

Total (%)
9.87%

Staff

Turnover (%)
0.85%

Involuntary (%)
6.01%

Total (%)
7.30%

Relationship with unions

Vale maintains good relations with unions worldwide, seeking to resolve any potential conflicts by means of ongoing meetings with representatives of these associations.

Worthy of note is the fact that from 2011 to 2020 there were no strikes or stoppages, in accordance with the terms of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) – which defines as a “strike” or “stoppage” movements lasting longer than 7 days.

Since 2005, company employees elect the effective members of the Administration Board and their respective alternates by direct vote. The elections are conducted jointly by the company and the unions.

Company labor relations representatives at different levels meet union representatives weekly to discuss routine questions and reinforce mutual dialogue.

A total of 97% of the labor force in the direct operations are covered by collective agreements.


Workforce of direct operations covered by collective bargaining agreements (per location)

Location Collective bargaining agreements (%) – base date: 2020
Brazil 100%
Canada 65%
Mozambique 98%
Indonesia 100%
Oman 100%
Location

Brazil

Collective bargaining agreements % – base date: oct/2019
100%

Canada

Collective bargaining agreements % – base date: oct/2019
77%

Mozambique

Collective bargaining agreements % – base date: oct/2019
98%

New Caledonia

Collective bargaining agreements % – base date: oct/2019
100%

Oman

Collective bargaining agreements % – base date: oct/2019
96%

Legal working time in the countries where Vale operates

Local Weekly hours
Brazil 44
Canada¹ 40
Mozambique 56
Indonesia 40
Malaysia² 48
Oman 45
Local

Brazil

Weekly hours
44

Canada¹

Weekly hours
40

Mozambique

Weekly hours
56

Malaysia²

Weekly hours
48

Oman

Weekly hours
45

¹ Up to 48 per week under compensation regime.
² It may exceed this number if the average over a period of three weeks does not exceed 48 hours.

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